Author of ‘Life Inc.’ Bashes Corporatism, Points to a New Way

Recently I’ve learned about a new book, Life Inc., by Douglas Rushkoff, scheduled for release June 2, 2009.

In a recent video, Rushkoff says he believes humanity is at a crucial point, not just a crisis but an opportunity. He thinks this is “probably the first moment in the last couple of hundred years that we’ve had to rebuild our society and our economy on principles that serve humanity instead of killing life.”

Rushkoff says he doesn’t believe banks should be rescued — but that we should let them die “so that we can get on with business.” What he means by that is new forms of business and investment that focus on local communities.

In his new book and in the video talk, Rushkoff advocates ways people can “start investing in one another and with one another and make their towns better, actually earn returns that you’re not going to get from your Smith Barney broker – I promise you that – and see the return of your investment in the place you actually live. That’s not hard to do.”

In the Life Inc. book, and in the video in a briefer form, Rushkoff traces the history of the current economic predicament. He points to the Renaissance as a crucial starting point. During that period, he proposes, the world economy changed fundamentally when monarchs, to stem their loss of power, ceded monopolies to corporations:

The renaissance was not a golden age. It was the end of a golden age. The renaissance was the moment in history when kings decided they were going to monopolize all of the value that people were creating throughout western Europe.

Instead of letting people make stuff and trade stuff, they created chartered corporations ….

 They picked individual businesses to charter and in return for the exclusive control over an industry or over a region, that company would then give the king shares of stock.

People would have to work for corporations. Instead of letting people in different towns make their own money, everyone would have to use coin of the realm. Instead of people creating and trading and selling art, now you would have to have a sponsor, a patron, who would then bring you to court and let you be an artist.

This centralization of economic power has continued as the model up to our time, says Rushkoff, and has resulted in a worldwide “dehumanizing trend,” in which humans are disconnected “from their own labor, from their own consumption, from their own pleasure”:

The society that we built for the industrial age was built to mythologize the mass-produced object, because we needed to create a society of consumers who thought that buying all of this stuff would somehow make them happier.

Here is the entire video talk:

AB — 11 May 2009